Muffaletta

BREAD

Ideally, it should be a bread as large as your outstretched hand which, when filled, is more than you should comfortably eat. Focaccia, Turkish or even those flat burger buns from the supermarket. (In fact, this whole thing can be sourced from your average supermarket.) I’m not a believer in scooping out any of the bread insides; I just don’t understand this move.

Cut the roll of choice all the way through, please. I promise it’s the right move.

MEAT

Meat needs to cover the porky spectrum, a minimum two. One must be a hot salami plus a pressed deli meat, preferably mortadella. The third can be your choice but again I implore you to stay within the porcine family. I’d choose capocollo or a double smoked ham. Chicken, turkey and beef small goods have no place here.

You need several slices per layer. They can be overlapped as required but they must reach edge to edge. But if you use too many slices, those whole things loses structural integrity.

THE WET STUFF

Now to the wet components. I like them top and bottom for maximum crumb penetration.

A good giardiniera (pickled cauliflower, carrot maybe some celery and onion) is the ideal place to start. If you can’t locate this Italian-style pickle look for something briny and pickle-y. It’s going to provide a satisfying crunch to the finished dish. Obviously, you can make it if you feel the need to. I like to add some roasted capsicums and then dice it all up.

Olive tapenade – again use a bought one for ease but feel free to make your own. Think olives (black or green or both) pitted and finely diced, garlic, anchovy, maybe some parsley, capers and all mixed with olive oil. Generously spread one of these on each side of the bread, ensuring to add some of the carrier liquid.

CHEESE

Provolone – not the piccante which can taste of bile to my mind. Two layers please. I’m ‘one of those people’ who always orders extra cheese on everything. I’ve used Jarlsberg from the supermarket and this works too. You’re looking for something mild yet creamy in flavour to balance out the rest of the components.

Important note.

No mayonnaise, mustard, or butter are necessary. There’s enough going on here as it is. Leave it to sit (and pressed under a weight is best) while you clean up. It needs this time for flavours to meld together and the juices to soak into the bread. Only toast it if you must. Cut into half so you can admire your layered handiwork.

It’s pickle-y, salty, creamy, earthy goodness – enjoy!

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